Walker’s World

Walker, the new friend of the Farmlet, has a voracious appetite for chewables.  To date he has killed Noodle’s squeaky plush toys; both the squirrel and the chipmunk!  He has also killed two of my good cotton anklets, and one pair of my favorite cotton underwear.

😠

If I am busy about the house, then he is in his puppy prison playpen.

It keeps him out of mischief.

Anyone care to guess who that photo bomber is?  😉

If I am seated watching TV he is attached to my little footstool/rolling table.  Even so, he tried to eat the corner of the couch, while I was sitting there.

🤯

In my studio he is on lead and attached to the cutting table…  and you guessed it, he found something to chew;  my expensive Tutto Sewing machine buggy!  It isn’t bad, but it is irritating.

Walker!  This is not a toy!

So today I took one of the many pockets I have saved from Bob’s old blue jeans and stuffed it with leftover quilting fluff and one of the squeaky buttons from the killed plush toys, then sewed it shut and voila!  A new chewy for Walker.

THANKS, MOM!

So, how long will it last?  Who can say?

I know these bad-dog symptoms are a direct result of boredom (and teething too), but what he needs is to go walking with me.   I walk him on lead in the backyard, but we can’t go anywhere else until his last Parvo inoculation.

In only 2.5 weeks and I am counting the days!

~*~

A word on dog/cat/human immunization:  There are some out there who are on the “no pet vaccine wagon”.  They are some of the same people who think that human immunizations are bad.  Well, I do not want to hear it.

  • I almost lost my little sister to Whooping Cough when she was about 4 years old.
  • I DID lose a dog to Parvo when I was a teen.

These two incidents were scary as hell and I will not skip an immunization for myself or my pets.  I can think of a lot of ways to die, but not from an unnecessary and preventable illness.

Nuff – said and OMSB now.

35 thoughts on “Walker’s World

  1. katechiconi says:

    Oh Walker… Just a few tattered reasons why the puppy years are tiring! He’s growing nicely. I think that must be the back legs and tail of an indignant Noodle. And those puppy playpen things are good, aren’t they? We’ve bought a taller, larger version to arrange around the door of the caravan so Mouse has some free ranging outdoor space when we’re camping instead of having to be tied up all the time.

    • Lynda says:

      Kate, he is growing like a weed! And yes to puppy playpens! We had a really good one from when Buddy was a pup, but then I started using it in the barn for the baby chickens as a transition from brooder to the chicken yard. The old one was a Cadillac compared to this, but it is adequate. I am a firm believer in not tying up a dog. It is too restricting and they always end up wrapped around a tree, or the lead is wrapped around their legs… OR chewed in two and the pooch is out on the RUN!

  2. claire93 says:

    totally with you on the vaccinations, for humans and animals!
    Also wishing you the best of luck with all the puppy teething incidents that are bound to happen along the way. As you know, they do grow out of it eventually ^^

    • Lynda says:

      Deb, they are like razors! The panties had perfectly shaped bite-marks cut into them. AND, I hate chasing him about the yard when he has snagged a slipper, sock, or whatever and then run out the doggie door with it! The little stinker. 😉

    • Lynda says:

      Tom, I don’t know if you are experiencing the reluctance in your country, but here we have been seeing a resurgence of disease we thought we had annihilated. Polio, measles and others are on the rise and they spread like wildfire in the school setting. It is truly sad and so unnecessary.

    • Lynda says:

      Ha! Kathy you have no idea how happy I was that I have been saving those pockets when I filleted the old denim jeans! I have plenty more just in case I need them. 😀

  3. petspeopleandlife says:

    Poor Walker is in that acute puppy stage. Puppies really are a hand full and it can be frustrating and expensive to have one that is not contained unless a human is on constant watch. But you have the right idea now with the puppy pen. I love that you made him a new squeaky toy. I think it is probably much more durable than the store bought ones.

    I had three fosters at one time this past year and one of them was a puppy, about 7-8 months old. I was asked to take her from another foster that could not foster anymore. She destroyed 10 or more ball point pens, 3 ethernet cables, my $265 RX glasses, the corner of a leather settee and then began chewing on the back rest of the same settee, 4 heavy duty pet towels, and 3 dog beds. Needless to say, I learned the hard way since I had forgotten what a puppy was like after not having one for many years. I confined her in large wire crate that I got from Atwoods. I still have Punkin by the way since she is a black chiweenie and black dogs are slow to be adopted. I love her though and when she finally gets a family to love her, I will be sick and cry for days.

    • Lynda says:

      Yvonne, why are black dogs hard to get adopted? And also, it sounds like you are attached to her… so why not keep her? You’ve put in the house to train her already! 🙂

      • petspeopleandlife says:

        It seems that many folks are either predjuced or superstitious. It seems absurb in a modern world but maybe we are not as modern as we believe. I love black dogs and black cats. Always have and always will. I just happen to only have one solid black cat at this time and a two of my dogs are mostly white with some black posts here and there. My little foster dog is chiweenies and she is black. with a few lovely marking of tan about her face and on chest. I would love to keep her but at my age I need older dogs and beside the fact that I foster failed a pappy that I got as a foster when I got these other two fosters. He is 6 years old and has crazy habits and marks and I didn’t think that anyone would put up with his so called quirks. Besides the fact I just love the little fella. I have had him a year now and he is only partially bonded to me. He was a neglected and unneutered dog that was often put out in the back yard in his former home. He is a 10 pound dog now but was about 3 pounds unweight when I got him. He also had flea dermatitis which I have worked to cure and that took several months to get his hair to grown back and RX derm defense by Hills Science Diet and special vitamins. I footed all his vet bills myself, meds, vax, and neuter before I decided to adopt him. I forgot that he is mostly black with some white patches.

  4. tialys says:

    I don’t know where Yvonne lives but here in France black dogs (and cats) are the most difficult to move out of the refuges. Something about being ‘evil’ or some such tosh.
    I haven’t homed a very young puppy now for a long time but, as you will have read on my latest post, sometimes even the older ones regress!

    • Lynda says:

      Lynn, I can’t imagine it! My favorite dogs have been black or mostly black. Conversely, I do know that there are many pet adoption folks who place a moratorium on black cat adoptions during October because of sick people and Halloween. There are all types of people out there and a lot of them are just weird.

      I hadn’t made it over yet, but OH MY! That is sad. 🤭

  5. Animalcouriers says:

    Cage training is really important! Boredom is also your worst enemy. Looks like you’ve found a great, never ending source of distractions. You both won’t know yourselves when you can get out in the big, fun world.

    • Lynda says:

      Annie, I crate trained and cage trained Tucker, Buddy and now Walker. It really makes life more pleasant for me and them. I left him off lead this morning and suddenly realized he wasn’t anywhere in the house! I fully expected that he had left me a surprise, but nope! He was outside doing his business. Good Boy, Walker!

    • Lynda says:

      Thank you, Anita! Merry Christmas and Happy New year to you as well. Ha! Walker is getting the idea of fetch, but only if we work on it without the Noodle dog. He is getting pretty good at it, but he has a very short attention span. Squirrel! Cat! Chicken! Mmnomummumnom! (you don’t want to know…) 🤗

  6. Mary Strong-Spaid says:

    Well…Now It is 3 months later and the whole world has changed!!
    Would be nice to go back to December when there were simpler things (like chewing) to worry about. Now everyone wants to be able to go outside for a long walk. Auuuugh! I don’t like feeling stuck, uncertain, and scared. Never been in a pandemic before. Maybe I should follow the wisdom of your puppy–and find something to chew on!!

    • Lynda says:

      I read a meme this week that we are all taking after dogs in this quarantine: Wandering the kitchen looking for more to eat, and getting excited to go take a walk. 😉

  7. Mary Strong-Spaid says:

    Hi Lynda
    Just checking in….hoping you are doing well.
    I hadn’t written anything on my WordPress blog for awhile, because I didn’t have much to write about. Haven’t gone anywhere, Haven’t done much due to the ‘Covid-19’ Pandemic.
    Sad situation.
    I just wrote something a few days ago, by using older photos remembering something that I did last year. But it is hard to be creative with all that is going on…
    Anyway….just wanted to say Hello!

    • Lynda says:

      Thank you for visiting Mary! ❤ I could take your words and put them in my reply and they would be valid. I have been too depressed with all of everything. Bob was home for six weeks and helped me with some very big projects in my gardens. I have been keeping myself busy in there and that I could write about, but by the time I get done I am too tired to think. That said, I could could post a few photos and a couple of words to tell about them; couldn't I? Maybe I will. 🙂

        • Lynda says:

          Thank you Steve. I have pretty much been avoiding anything internet media. My blog, Facebook, Twitter as well as friend’s blogs. Too much anger and if you say something, even as honest and gently as you can, you are then blasted to hell with vitriol. Who needs that? Best to stay out of it. Does that make me an ostrich? Perhaps so. I feel our country is balanced on the edge of a knife…

    • Lynda says:

      OH YES! And to Mary, and you Steve, before that I had a terrible mishap involving a very boisterous puppy, a Nylabone, the wood floor in the kitchen and a fall that resulted in bruised knees and a broken finger. I actually think that began my E-world hiatus. 😛

  8. Steve Schwartzman says:

    “Balanced on the edge of a knife” is a good way to put it. I expected not to still be around when there was this much of a collapse, but things have been accelerating. We still have nature.

    • Lynda says:

      “I expected not to still be around when there was this much of a collapse…”
      Steve, it is the same for me. Thank God for the lovely things he’s made; they are a balm for our soul.

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